We all love food that tastes good, and does good.
Delicious, familiar food shouldn't come at a big cost to our wallets, our health, or the planet. It's not just a nice idea. It's a human right.
RIGHT?
But our food system is at breaking point.
Major health and environmental crises are being fuelled by food, with meat production at the centre of this. Our life support system is in jeopardy.
SERIOUSLY.
Welcome to the frontier of food innovation.
There are better ways to produce the foods we love and support a healthy, humane and sustainable food system. It's simple. But ingenious.
SHOW ME.

We all love food that tastes good, and does good.
Delicious, familiar food shouldn't come at a big cost to our wallets, our health, or the planet. It's not just a nice idea. It's a human right. RIGHT?

Food fuels our lives. It nourishes us, brings us closer together, and gives us what we need to thrive. No matter who you are, where you come from or what your customs and culture, food is an integral part of who we all are.

We want food that's familiar; delicious meals we know and love. Food that's prepared with care. Food that comforts us and reminds us of good times.

We want food that's new and creative. Food that ignites our imagination and excites our taste buds. Food that inspires us to live well.

And we want food that doesn't harm our bodies or the world. Food that's safe, clean and nutritious into the future, for our children and grandchildren. It's a human right, but one that's under severe threat.


UP NEXT: Our food system is under crisis

But our food system is at breaking point.
Major health and environmental crises are being fuelled by food, with intensively raised meat at the centre of this. Our life support system is in jeopardy. SERIOUSLY.

Much of our food today comes from large-scale animal farming—a highly wasteful and destructive method of food production that's rapidly sucking up the world's resources, trashing the planet and making us sick.
Chronic Diseases

In countries like Australia and the USA, most people eat around 100kg of meat annually—almost double the average from 1950. It's no surprise that the biggest killers in these countries are now heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, which have been linked to the consumption of animal-based meat in thousands of medical studies.

Health & Hygiene

Infectious diseases like influenza can decimate intensively farmed animal populations and spread to people. Faecal bacteria from slaughtered animals' intestines can also contaminate meat; with four out out of five portions of raw chicken meat in Australia contaminated according to Food Standards Australia New Zealand.

Superbugs

The overcrowded conditions of factory farms and intensive fish farms are ripe breeding grounds for antibiotic- resistant bugs. The world's leading health authorities warn that overuse of antibiotics in animal agriculture risks a return to commonplace illnesses, injuries and infections once again becoming fatal.

Climate Change

Livestock contribute as much to global greenhouse emissions as the world's entire transportation sector. According to Chatham House, even if the burning of fossil fuels were to cease, our system of animal agriculture would still push the climate beyond 2-degrees of warming, leading to irreversible and climate change.

Water Pollution

Waterways and oceans are also polluted by livestock production. A factory farm with 5,000 pigs can produce as much effluent as a town of 20,000 people. But unlike sewage treatment in most towns, effluent from intensive pig farms often ends up in large open-aired 'lagoons', which can contaminate underground drinking water and run off into rivers and oceans.

Marine Destruction

Animal manure run-off is choking underwater ecosystems worldwide, contributing to ocean 'dead zones'. Commercial fish farming can destroy habitats through toxic bacterial overgrowth. And 'super trawlers' — massive fishing ships — kill dolphins, seals and turtles alongside countless fish every time their enormous nets are pulled in. The UN estimates that 90% of the world's fish stocks are now fully fished or overfished.

Land Clearing & Extinction

Meat farming is wiping out habitats on land at an alarming rate. Animal agriculture is the leading cause of deforestation and biodiversity loss worldwide, including in the Amazon. In Australia, iconic animals like the koala face being bulldozed when Queensland forests are cleared — 91% of which is for cattle grazing.

Food & Water Scarcity

Animals eat on average six kilograms of plant protein to produce a single kilogram of meat. We're feeding edible grains to animals and then we're eating those animals, which is not only hugely wasteful, it can increase the cost of grain for people living in poverty. Animal agriculture also sucks up much of the world's fresh water supply, with 1,500L of water required to produce a single conventionally produced hamburger—roughly the same amount a human would drink in three years!

Animal Suffering

Like us, farmed animals fear pain, seek comfort, and wish to live free from harm. Most animals we eat today — about 70 billion worldwide — live in factories of steel and concrete, and are denied the expression of any natural behaviours. Many also routinely suffer extreme confinement and surgical procedures without pain relief, like the removal of tails, teeth and beaks.



UP NEXT: There is a better way forward thanks to FOOD INNOVATION

Welcome to the frontier of food innovation.
There are better ways to produce the foods we love and support a healthy, humane and sustainable food system. It's simple. But ingenious. SHOW ME.

To feed the world's growing population in coming years without compromising the health of people or the planet, we must champion ground-breaking new ways of producing food.

Fortunately, through technology, science and innovation, we have the ingredients we need to revolutionise our favourite foods, including meat—possibly the most damaging of them all. Around the world, a growing cohort of food innovators are creating delicious burgers and meatballs and fillets without the chickens and cows and fish.

Food Frontier is clearing the path for these new pioneers, as well as existing industry leaders, to make these foods as delicious, affordable and accessible as possible, and foster innovation within Australia's protein sector. We're set on bringing about systemic change for the health of people and planet by accelerating these cleaner, healthier food creations.


How It Works

Plant-Based Meat

Why do we eat meat — because it comes from a slaughtered animal, causes pollution or might be contaminated with salmonella? No. We eat meat because we like the taste, it's familiar, and it's widely accessible and affordable. So what if we could enjoy the same delicious experience and ease without the bad stuff? Well now we can, thanks to some very clever entrepreneurs and food scientists.

A growing number of visionary food start-ups are harnessing plants, food technology and behavioural economics to create plant-based meat that tastes, smells and sizzles like

A growing number of visionary food start-ups are harnessing plants, food technology and behavioural economics to create plant-based meat that tastes, smells and sizzles like animal-based meat, at equal or higher nutritional value. They ask a simple question: what makes meat, meat? And the answer is pretty simple: amino acids, lipids, vitamins, minerals and water. The exact same nutrients found in plants.

By first examining meat at the molecular level, these food experts carefully select the same nutrients from plant species—including ones that haven't previously been widely explored for food production—and combine them to produce the taste, texture and overall experience of eating meat.


  Example: The Impossible Burger
Clean Meat

Clean meat, or cultured meat, comes from a simple realisation. In the current food industry, animals are used as meat-making machines—but, they're a terribly wasteful method of converting H2O (water) and plant protein (feed) into animal protein (meat). So food leaders asked: how could we produce the same product without using animals, which are damaging, resource-intensive and disease-prone? Enter: cellular agriculture.

Cellular agriculture is the process of harvesting animal cells instead of entire animals. It involves taking a tiny sample of

Cellular agriculture is the process of harvesting animal cells instead of entire animals. It involves taking a tiny sample of real animal cells (from a sesame seed-sized biopsy), and placing it in a mineral bath, or 'media', which contains all the same inputs the animal would typically consume—water, vitamins, minerals and amino acids. The cells grow into meat, like they would in an animal's body, but without any hormones, antibiotics, genetic modification or bacterial contamination, and with a fraction of the resources (hence the term 'clean meat'!) Plus, genetic modification isn’t required. At scale, the process takes place inside steel tanks—similar to what you would find in a beer brewery.


  Example: Memphis Meats

Where We Come In

Connecting, facilitating, advocating.

At Food Frontier, we believe healthy, humane and sustainable food should be a delicious and affordable reality for everyone.

We're a DGR-endorsed non-profit working to accelerate the growth of game-changing protein innovations, like plant-based and clean meat, across the Asia Pacific for the sake of people and planet.

By supporting diversification of Australia's local and international meat markets, and leveraging the country's influence in the Asia Pacific food sector, the shift towards greener, healthier protein sources can happen far more quickly.


Facilitate

We provide expertise and support to facilitate the emergence of game-changing protein innovations through conducting research, promoting investment and improving supply chain integration.

Connect

We provide networks and market insights to connect innovators and industry with high-impact opportunities to develop, produce and supply new protein innovations in our region.

Advocate

We provide information and influence to advocate to consumers, businesses and government the health, environmental and economic benefits of new proteins innovations.


2017 - 18 Strategy: 1. Industry Acceleration — help food leaders to harness the unique market opportunities in Australia and grow new protein innovations across the Asia Pacific region.
  • Facilitate the market entry of leading international companies in the development and production of plant-based and clean meat. Provide expertise, network connections and market insights to support them in developing a competitive market foothold and presence in the Asia Pacific region.
  • Connect new food innovators to our broad network of stakeholders and unique market opportunities, ultimately helping them grow and succeed in the Asia Pacific region.
2. Public Advocacy — help consumers to embrace healthier protein choices, and support the food outlets that make this possible.
  • Advocate the benefits of plant-based proteins and clean meat to food producers, providers, public institutions and consumers across Australia, and drive programs that inspire consumers in our region to choose more of these options in favour of conventional meat.
  • Facilitate the inclusion of new protein offerings in restaurant chains and grocery stores through market research, consumer engagement and collaborative initiatives with other leading bodies.
 



Through expertise, networks and market insight, we grow the movement for game-changing protein innovations — like plant-based and clean meat — across the Asia Pacific, for the good of people and planet.

“I believe that in 30 years or so ... all meat will either be clean or plant-based, taste the same and also be much healthier for everyone.”
Richard Branson

Our Team

Thomas King

Thomas King

Executive Director

For 8 years Thomas has worked on environmental, animal welfare, health and global development projects across 5 continents, from conserving rainforests in Borneo to helping alleviate poverty in Cambodia, even documenting climate change in the Arctic with IMAX. Recognising there was a common link between all of these issues, Thomas founded Food Frontier to create a healthier, more sustainable food system by accelerating groundbreaking meat alternatives to animal agriculture. Thomas was named Young Australian of the Year (VIC) in 2015.

David Bucca

David Bucca

Operations Director

For over 12 years, David has worked for the world's leading aerospace companies including Boeing and Airbus across Switzerland, Malaysia, Australia and Germany. As an aerospace engineer and previous business owner, David has a wealth of expertise in project and operations management, strategy development and manufacturing, which he is excited to bring to Food Frontier to help accelerate the growth of groundbreaking meat alternatives across the Asia Pacific.

Food Frontier works with a range of talented contractors, consultants and pro bono researchers, and is in the process of expanding our team.

Advisory Council

 
Michael Pellman Rowland

Michael Pellman Rowland

Partner at Alpenrose Wealth Management Intl

HRH Prince Khaled bin Alwaleed

HRH Prince Khaled bin Alwaleed

CEO, KBW Ventures

ANGELINE ACHARIYA

ANGELINE ACHARIYA

CEO, Food Innovation Centre

Dr Despina Handolias MBBS, FRACP

Dr Despina Handolias MBBS, FRACP

Medical Oncologist

MICHAEL CHRISTIE

MICHAEL CHRISTIE

Molecular Biologist & Patent Attorney

BRUCE FRIEDRICH

BRUCE FRIEDRICH

Director, The Good Food Institute

DAMIEN MANDER

DAMIEN MANDER

International Conservationist

Kelsie Nabben

Kelsie Nabben

Government Relations & Start-Up Strategist

JAMES FORBES

JAMES FORBES

Marketing Director

Let’s chat!

www.foodfrontier.org